Volunteers Needed

There are a TON of upcoming community events that depend on local volunteers.  Show your support by giving your time to one of these upcoming events.  Your time commitment could be as little as a hour and could be done individually or in groups with family, friends or co-workers.
 
If you’re planning to participate in one of these events, don’t rule out volunteering.  Many different volunteer roles are needed and don’t conflict with participating.  Volunteering at registration or event clean up allows you to participate in the race AND volunteer.
 
If you’re not planning to walk or run, volunteering is a great way to get in on the action.  Check out these other benefits of volunteering at a race event.
 
UPCOMING EVENTS
MFT Glow Run, Sept 9th
Spooky Sprint, Oct 28th

Ready to Ride

As a Bronze level Bicycle Friendly Community, Hutchinson offers several bike events to participate in.  Get out and explore.  #muchinhutch #bikehutch [Read more…]

Tip: 5 simple steps to be your best at any age

Author: Kay Johnson

They say you’re only as young as you feel, and if you’re an older American, the ability to feel young a little while longer is always appealing. Having a youthful state of mind goes a long way toward accomplishing this goal, but you can’t ignore the importance of solid physical health.

To improve your physical and mental health and prove age is just a number, apply these five tips from Mayo Clinic today. 

  • Find the perfect interval. If you’ve never participated in high-intensity interval training before, here’s a compelling reason to start. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic found high-intensity aerobic exercise actually reversed some cellular aspects of aging. The research also found that the exercise improved muscle proteins, enlarged muscles and increased energy levels.
  • The benefit of brain games. A sharp mind is every bit as important as a healthy body, and exercising your brain can be a lot of fun. Spend time learning new things on the internet, enroll in a class for that craft you’ve always wanted to master, go out with friends, or sit down and play a board game.
  • Supplementing your health. Health supplements should never completely replace whole food offerings, but they may offer you real health value as well. According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, supplements may be ideal for vegans and vegetarians or those who consume less than 1,600 calories per day. People with a condition affecting the way their body absorbs nutrients and those who have had surgery on their digestive tract should also speak with their doctor about supplements that may improve their overall health.
  • The importance of sleep. A good night’s sleep offers health benefits at any age, but getting enough rest can be more difficult as you get older. To get a better night’s sleep, review your medications with your doctor to see if anything is impacting your rest. You should also try to limit your daytime napping (just 10 to 20 minutes per day is best) and avoid alcohol, caffeine or even water within a couple hours before bedtime.
  • Focus on your sexual health. This topic may not be as widely discussed as your physical or mental health, but it is no less important. Men should talk to their doctors about their lessening testosterone levels, which drop about 1 percent per year after age 30. Women may experience a similar drop in estrogen levels as well and should consult their doctor for treatment options. Don’t be shy about discussing sexual health issues with your doctor.

By incorporating some of these tips from the experts at Mayo Clinic, you’ll make sure the best years of your life are still to come. You can learn more about improving your health at any age through the advice offered in Mayo Clinic on Healthy Aging, or visitwww.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle.

 

Source: Brandpoint

Spring Forward

We’re ready for Spring!  As the weather warms up, we’re ready to lace up and get outside.  Check out 2017’s list of activities and consider trying something new this year.  #MuchinHutch

What’s Happening

6 small steps to improve your health in a big way

Author: Kay Johnson

You want to be healthier, right? But try as you might, it always seems like something’s standing in your way. Time and money are two of the largest obstacles, and you may think it’s impossible to improve your health without a significant time or financial investment.

The good news is, however, that’s not true. Even the smallest changes can have a big impact on your health, and you can start improving your wellness today with these six simple steps:

[Read more…]

Try something new: Snowshoes

Hutchinson Health, Heart of Hutch and PRCE have worked together to provide snow shoes available to try out with your family, friends or groups.  Beginning Dec 19th, snowshoes can be picked up from the PRCE office Monday-Friday from 9:00 am—3:00 pm. Fee is for package of 6 pairs (adult and youth sizes available). Call 320-587-2975 for availability.

#171 (Hutchinson PRCE)

Fee: $25 for up to 3 days

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The Key to Keep Moving

Winter is here.  With holidays and cold weather, it’s easy to lose focus on staying active. A key to keep moving is to not get too down on yourself.  While we all might be skipping scheduled workouts and eating a few extra calories, there’s also new opportunities to be active and have fun.  Take advantage of each opportunity to get at least some physical activity in your day.  Each minute counts and adds up.

Here are some easy ways to get some extra activity in –

  • Shovel your driveway.
  • If shopping, take an extra lap around the store or mall.
  • Walk your cart back inside the store.
  • Think of active gift ideas to give others.  As they get excited about an activity, so will you!
  • If you’re going to buy yourself something new, consider quality cold-weather gear to keep you comfortable for longer when outside. You won’t regret the difference it makes!
  • Put on some music and dance, whether solo or as a family.
  • If you’re kids are in activities, consider taking a spectator break for a 10 minute walk with another parent.
  • Lastly, don’t let the kids have all the fun.  Build your own snowperson and find the perfect sledding hill.

 

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Walk & Bike to School Day

Walking School BusWalk & Bike to School Day is Wednesday, October 5th.

Park Elementary will host Mayor Gary Forcier, Fire Chief Mike Schumann and Police Chief Dan Hatten and other Heart of Hutch volunteers leading groups of kids along identified walking routes for the 5th year!   Snack station will be available to walkers, bikers and volunteers in the am.

Check out the Walking School Bus Routes and join us on our way to Park Elementary!

In light of concerns that parents have been voicing, Police Chief Hatten has provided this statement –

“The Annual Walk to School Day is an opportunity for us as a community to encourage our children to begin healthy life style habits by walking to school. It is also an opportunity to renew or begin family safety plans to prevent abductions. This event affirms the message that our community is safe and we as a community will not be limited by criminal behavior in our society.”

Family Safety Planning tips from Chief Hatten.

Walking Safety information and tips

Bike and Pedestrian Videos from the Bicycle Alliance of MN.
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Family Safety Planning Tips

A message from Hutchinson Police Chief, Dan Hatten

I believe it is important to teach children how to avoid being seized, how to resist a potential captor and how to escape. Kids are vulnerable and trusting, and it is our job as parents to remind them of basic safety rules, including:

1.Don’t walk away with anyone other than a parent, or the person who was already arranged to take care of you that day. 2. Remember, an adult does not need help from a child — not to find a puppy, not for anything. If an adult is asking you for help, that’s a warning sign. 3. Avoid getting into a car with a stranger at all costs. 4. Know the rules: what is OK and what is not OK, and have confidence to take action if you feel someone is trying to take advantage of you.

The most important thing parents can do is to communicate openly with their children at home. Have a home atmosphere in which kids can let you know what is going on in their life. A very important point is to re-learn old concepts of adult/children interaction. Teach your child his rights. He has the right to say “no.” Children should know there are different rules for different situations; they don’t have to always be polite. Politeness can translate into doing what the potential abductor says.

Teach Your Child Techniques to Avoid Being Taken In any potential abduction situation, there are windows of opportunity for the child to make choices that could save his or her life. Abductors win through intimidation, so it is very important to give your child good self-esteem and the confidence to carry through these possibly life-saving techniques. Consider practicing these techniques at home or school, with other parents and kids. The more kids practice, the more they will remember these techniques, and the more secure and confident they will feel in following through if they ever have to.

  1. The Velcro technique — Make like Velcro: Grab and hold onto something and do not let go. Grab a tree, grab a bike, grab a stop sign post, or even grab a different adult, because another adult is not usually involved in an abduction. This makes it harder to disengage a child in an attempted abduction. 2. Yell as loud as you can “Stop, Stranger!” — Teach your child that anyone that is not a mother or father is in the new definition of a stranger if they are trying to take you away. 3. Windmill technique or swimming technique — Rotate arms in a big circle, preventing attacker from getting a good grip. This can turn attackers arms inside out — which is a weaker position from which he could grab hold of the child. 4. Make a lot of noise — Give a child a whistle on a necklace and teach them to blow on that whistle when they might be in danger. Bang on something, scream, be loud to call attention from others who might be able to help. A good commotion can frighten an abductor and by shifting the balance of power, turn the tables on them.

How to escape from a car If a child is somehow placed into a car by an abductor, there is usually a three-hour window of opportunity. The abductor doesn’t usually hurt the child immediately — there is time to escape if the child-learned-behavior allows the child not to panic and be reactive. Therefore, it is helpful for children to know methods of escaping, such as the following:

  1. Reach for the door and try to get out immediately. 2. Do not be passive. In a four-door car, the child can jump in the backseat and try the door quickly. 3. If the child is placed in a trunk, don’t panic: Look for a panel in the trunk that comes right out when you pull on it. Tear the wires to the tail-lights and brakes. Police might then pull the abductor over.

Abductors are often someone whom the child knows Abductors don’t usually fit the stereotypical profile of a scary, creepy stranger or dirty old man. Motives are often sexual and most are not true strangers. They target children and seek their confidence by developing a casual relationship with them. Family abductors make up the majority of kidnap offenders, as in a custody battle.

Final safety reminders for parents 1. Know where your children are, and know who they know. 2. Pay attention to changes in your child’s behavior. 3. Never leave your child alone in a public place, car, or stroller. 4. Never ask a stranger to hold your baby, even for an instant. 5. Don’t label their lunch boxes or clothing. 6. Don’t let children go out alone. Remember the buddy system in swimming. 7. Teach your child their telephone number, how to contact you and a close friend. 8. Pay attention to threats. 9. In custody battles, get social security, credit card numbers, and addresses. 10. Take a lot of photos of your child and keep them current. 11. Keep dental and medical records. 12. Have a neighborhood meeting so that children know safe houses in the neighborhood where they can run in the case of an emergency. 13. Never open the door without having a secret password between you and your child. 14. Older children should be encouraged to use their critical thinking and intuition, and to anticipate, for example, slow-driving cars in front of a neighborhood or playground.

Remember, above all else, safety first. Prevention is the key. Develop a family plan of action for emergency and crisis situation, and practice and rehearse them with your children through role modeling and role-playing. Teach your children the rules, and give them the confidence they need to be able to follow through on the escape techniques outlined above. Emphasize your child’s right of privacy and ownership, and that sexual advances from adults are against the law.

If they are involved and invested, children are more likely to remember and take action if someone tries to abduct them. We have to empower our kids to help keep them safe.

How to escape from a car If a child is somehow placed into a car by an abductor, there is usually a three-hour window of opportunity. The abductor doesn’t usually hurt the child immediately — there is time to escape if the child-learned-behavior allows the child not to panic and be reactive. Therefore, it is helpful for children to know methods of escaping, such as the following:

  1. Reach for the door and try to get out immediately. 2. Do not be passive. In a four-door car, the child can jump in the backseat and try the door quickly. 3. If the child is placed in a trunk, don’t panic: Look for a panel in the trunk that comes right out when you pull on it. Tear the wires to the tail-lights and brakes. Police might then pull the abductor over.

Abductors are often someone whom the child knows Abductors don’t usually fit the stereotypical profile of a scary, creepy stranger or dirty old man. Motives are often sexual and most are not true strangers. They target children and seek their confidence by developing a casual relationship with them. Family abductors make up the majority of kidnap offenders, as in a custody battle.

Final safety reminders for parents

  1. Know where your children are, and know who they know.
  2. Pay attention to changes in your child’s behavior.
  3. Never leave your child alone in a public place, car, or stroller.
  4. Never ask a stranger to hold your baby, even for an instant.
  5. Don’t label their lunch boxes or clothing.
  6. Don’t let children go out alone. Remember the buddy system in swimming.
  7. Teach your child their telephone number, how to contact you and a close friend.
  8. Pay attention to threats.
  9. In custody battles, get social security, credit card numbers, and addresses.
  10. Take a lot of photos of your child and keep them current.
  11. Keep dental and medical records.
  12. Have a neighborhood meeting so that children know safe houses in the neighborhood where they can run in the case of an emergency.
  13. Never open the door without having a secret password between you and your child.
  14. Older children should be encouraged to use their critical thinking and intuition, and to anticipate, for example, slow-driving cars in front of a neighborhood or playground.

Remember, above all else, safety first. Prevention is the key. Develop a family plan of action for emergency and crisis situation, and practice and rehearse them with your children through role modeling and role-playing. Teach your children the rules, and give them the confidence they need to be able to follow through on the escape techniques outlined above. Emphasize your child’s right of privacy and ownership, and that sexual advances from adults are against the law.

If they are involved and invested, children are more likely to remember and take action if someone tries to abduct them. We have to empower our kids to help keep them safe.

          Safety tips from Dr. Gail Gross

          Respectfully,

          Daniel T. Hatten

          Hutchinson Police Chief

Stay Active – Day and Night

Soak up every last bit of perfect running weather in these two back to back weekends that will have you running all night and all day. 

 

Ready. Set. Glow.  September 10th

McLeod for Tomorrow’s Glow Run promises to have event more glow than last year.  Kids 12 and under are free with a paid adult.  Get glowing and register here

 

Luce Line Lace-Up September 17th

With a  1k, 5k, 10k, Half Marathon, this event has a distance for everyone.  If you really want to get wild, register for the Triple Crow to run the 10k, then the 5k, then the 1k Dash. That’s right.  Almost 10 miles total for a collection of race shirts, bling, swag bag (duffle bag), finisher medals and (most importantly) bragging rights. Lace-Up and register here. This race benefits MEADA, Special Olympics, and Heart of Hutch (Thank you!).

And it’s not so coincidental that this event is happening during Arts and Craft Festival and Taste of Hutchinson.  When we say #MuchinHutch, we don’t always mean on the same day, but September 17th will have it all!

Proceeds from the Glow Run and Luce Line Lace-Up help make Hutchinson and our surrounding communities better.  THANK YOU race organizers, sponsors, and volunteers.

 

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Heart of Hutch

Heart of Hutch